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Full text of "Programs, for the nation-wide celebration in 1932 of the two hundredth anniversary of the birth of George Washington : for patriotic societies, clubs, and all organizations, schools, colleges and other educational institutions, February 22 to Thanksgiving Day, 1932"

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Programs 

for the 

NATION-WIDE CELEBRATION 
IN 1932 

of the 

WO HUNDREDTH ANNIVERSARY 
OF THE BIRTH OF 

GEORGE 
WASHINGTON 

For Patriotic Societies 

Clubs, and all Organizations 

Schools, Colleges 

and other Educational 

Institutions 



ISSUED BY THE UNITED STATES 
RGE WASHINGTON BICENTENNIAL COMMISSION 

1931 




A PORTRAIT OF GEORGE WASHINGTON 

BY CHARLES W. PEALE 





MARTHA WASHINGTON 

ENGRAVED BY 
WILLIAM SARTIN 



MARY BALL WASHI NGTON 

THE MOTHER OF GEORGE WASHINGTON 

A POPULAR PORTRAIT. ORIGINAL 

UNAVAILABLE 



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UNITED STATES GEORGE WASHINGTON 
BICENTENNIAL COMMISSION 

President of the United States 
HERBERT HOOVER 

Chairman 

Vice President of the United States, Charles Curtis 
Speaker of the House of Representatives, Nicholas Longworth 

House of Representatives 

Willis C. Hawley 
Oregon 

John Q. Tilson 



United States Senate 



SlMEON D. Fess, Vice Chairman 
Ohio 

Arthur Capper 
Kansas 

Carter Glass 

Virginia 



Connecticut 
Joseph W. Byrns 

Tennessee 

R. Walton Moore 
Virginia 

Presidential Commissioners 
Mrs. John Dickinson Sherman C. Bascom Slemp 



Colorado 

Mrs. Anthony Wayne Cook 
Pennsylvania 

Henry Ford 

Michigan 

George Eastman 
New York 



Virginia 

Wallace McCamant 
Oregon 

Albert Bushnell Hart 
Massachusetts 

Bernard M. Baruch 
New York 



Associate Directors 
Lieut. Col. U. S. Grant, 3d Representative Sol Bloom 

Historian 
Prof. Albert Bushnell Hart 

Executive Offices: Washington Building, Washington, D. C. 



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788454 



IMPORTANT 

(J}hese twelve programs and the forty- 
four papers prepared on the subjects in the 
programs depict, the life, character, and 
achievements of George Washington. They 
are for patriotic societies, clubs, and all 
organisations — schools, colleges, and other 
educational institutions. 

Programs, papers, booklets, pageants, 
plays, and other like material issued by the 
George Washington Bicentennial Commis- 
sion will be sent upon request without 
charge. Such material may be kept by you 
for future reference. 



Address Communications to 

GEORGE WASHINGTON BICENTENNIAL COMMISSION 

Washington Building, Washington, D. C. 



141 



CONTENTS 

Page 

Honor George Washington 6 

To Writers and Readers: 

Papers on all subjects in the programs 7 

Inter-Library Loan Service 7 

George Washington booklets 7 

Frontier Background of Washington's Career. 

Contemporary Tributes to Washington. 

Washington the Man of Mind. 

Washington as a Religious Man. 

Washington, Proprietor of Mount Vernon. 

Washington the Colonial and Continental Statesman. 

Washington the Military Man. 

Washington's Part in Building the Constitution. 

Washington the President. 

Home and Fraternal Life of Washington. 

Race Elements in Washington's Time. 

The Washington Family in England and America. 

Washington the Traveler. 

Washington the Business Man. 

Washington the Engineer and City Builder. 

Best Books on Washington. 

Pledge to the Flag — The American's Creed 8 

Program Titles: 

1. Family Relationships of George Washington 9 

2. Homes of George Washington 10 

3. Youth and Manhood of George Washington 11 

4. The Mother of George Washington 12 

5. George Washington the Man of Sentiment 13 

6. George Washington the Man of Action 14 

7. George Washington the Christian 15 

8. George Washington the Leader of Men 16 

9. The Social Life of George Washington 17 

10. George Washington the Builder of the Nation 18 

11. George Washington the President (1789-1797) 19 

12. The Homemaking of George and Martha Washington 20 

Additional Activities 21 

Page Page 

Pageants 21 Juvenile activities 24 

Plays and playlets 22 Speeches 25 

Motion pictures 23 Radio 25 

Slides 24 Tree planting 25 

Music, Colonial 24 

Washington Letters 26 

Selected Books Relating to George Washington 27 



151 



HONOR GEORGE WASHINGTON 

(J)he Two Hundredth Anniversary of the Birth of George 
Washington will be celebrated in 1932. Begin now to plan 
your part in this great historic event. 

Read about him ! 

Thin\ about him ! 
Tal\ about him ! 

The more you know about him, the more you will want 
to show your gratitude for the man who founded and 
established this Nation. 

Learn of his courage and strength of character; his 
achievements as a surveyor, engineer, soldier, commander, 
farmer, business man, writer, patriot, statesman, and the 
First President of the United States. 

Use these programs for the George Washington Bicen- 
tennial meetings of your organisation. The subjects pre- 
sented cover the most important events in his life history. 
Papers prepared on these subjects tell the things you will 
want to know. 

Interest the children. Impress upon them the character of 
George Washington. With the inspiration of his life always 
before them, they will grow into manhood and womanhood 
with the highest ideals of American citizenship. 

Present pageants and plays. Show motion pictures and 
slides and become more familiar with the scenes of Colonial 
days and events during the lifetime of George Washington. 

Let no man, woman, or child — no village, town, city, or 
State — fail to give expression of homage to the Father of 
Our Country in 1932. 



161 



TO WRITERS AND READERS 

Papers on all Subjects in the Programs 
The papers which accompany the programs supplement 
each other, but each is complete in itself. They bring out 
the sources of the talents and qualities contributing to the 
harmonious union of intellectual and moral powers which 
George Washington possessed and show, step by step, the 
development of those powers. Those who write their own 
papers will find these issued by the Commission of assist- 
ance in the preparation. Following each program is a note 
giving the numbers of the best books in the list of authori- 
ties upon which the papers are based. 

Inter'Library Loan Service 
Through the Inter-Library Loan Service of the Library 
of Congress, any public library in the country can borrow 
almost any book (excepting reference and genealogical 
books) from the Library of Congress. Such books may be 
consulted under the supervision of the library borrowing 
them. 

George Washington Booklets 

Each booklet presents some aspect of Washington's life, 
environment, or activities. In the preparation of addresses, 
research, study, and general reading, the booklets will be 
of special interest. They are being prepared under the 
direction of Professor Albert Bushnell Hart, and will be 
issued by the Commission and sent upon request free of 
charge. For list, see Contents. 



171 



PLEDGE TO THE FLAG 

I PLEDGE ALLEGIANCE TO THE FLAG OF THE 
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA AND TO 
THE REPUBLIC FOR WHICH IT STANDS; ONE 
NATION INDIVISIBLE, WITH LIBERTY AND 
JUSTICE FOR ALL. 



THE AMERICAN'S CREED 

I BELIEVE IN THE UNITED STATES OF 
AMERICA AS A GOVERNMENT OF THE 
PEOPLE, BY THE PEOPLE, FOR THE PEOPLE; 
WHOSE JUST POWERS ARE DERIVED FROM 
THE CONSENT OF THE GOVERNED; A DEMOC- 
RACY IN A REPUBLIC; A SOVEREIGN NATION 
OF MANY SOVEREIGN STATES; A PERFECT 
UNION, ONE AND INSEPARABLE; ESTABLISHED 
UPON THOSE PRINCIPLES OF FREEDOM, 
EQUALITY, JUSTICE, AND HUMANITY FOR 
WHICH AMERICAN PATRIOTS SACRIFICED 
THEIR LIVES AND FORTUNES. ((I THEREFORE 
BELIEVE IT IS MY DUTY TO MY COUNTRY TO 
LOVE IT; TO SUPPORT ITS CONSTITUTION; 
TO OBEY ITS LAWS; TO RESPECT ITS FLAG; 
AND TO DEFEND IT AGAINST ALL ENEMIES. 

— William Tyler Page 



181 



Program One 



FAMILY RELATIONSHIPS OF 
GEORGE WASHINGTON 



PATRIOTIC MUSIC (to be selected) 
PLEDGE TO THE FLAG 
THE AMERICAN'S CREED 

FAMILY NAME OF WASHINGTON 

George Washington's name is found in English records as early 
as seven and a half centuries ago. It is of Saxon origin and came 
from the name of a village. After many changes it became the 
Washington we know. 

ANCESTRY 

Paternal: This is a story of the ancestors of George Washington. 
It tells of their descent from about 1183 and of the positions of 
the English family at various periods. 

Maternal: George Washington's maternal ancestry is almost as 
historic as the Washingtons. The Ball family is represented in Eng- 
land by many branches. His mother's forebears were democratic 
in principle and of strong religious bent. 

RELATIVES 

George Washington was well supplied with relatives. He had 
two stepbrothers, three brothers, one sister, at least twenty-two 
nephews and nieces, two stepchildren, four step-grandchildren. 
The story of his relations with them makes interesting reading. 

MUSIC 

Song, "America" or "Star-Spangled Banner," by the audience. 



For references and material in preparing papers for Program One 
see numbers 19, 23, 32, 54, 101 in list of authorities 

24258°— 31 2 | 9 J 



Program Two 



HOMES OF 
GEORGE WASHINGTON 



PATRIOTIC MUSIC (to be seleded) 
PLEDGE TO THE FLAG 
THE AMERICAN'S CREED 

WAKEFIELD 

George Washington was born at Bridges Creek estate, later 
called Wakefield, February 22, 1732. Three years later the family 
moved away. In 1780 the house was burned. It is now being 
rebuilt in reproduction of the original. 

MOUNT VERNON 

At Epsewasson, renamed Mount Vernon, George Washington 
lived in childhood. It became his property on his brother's death. 
There he lived for over 50 years. It was the first home in America 
in his lifetime as it is the first shrine in the United States to-day. 

THE HOMESTEAD ON THE RAPPAHANNOCK 

The Rappahannock River homestead was the one home pur* 
chased by George Washington's father. There he died in 1743. 
George's mother resided there until the Revolution. 

OTHER HOMES OF WASHINGTON 

George Washington built homes at Bath, W. Va., and at Alex' 
andria. During the Revolution his homes were his many military 
headquarters in seven States. The Presidential mansions were in 
New York and Philadelphia. 

MUSIC 

Song, "America" or "Star 'Spangled Banner," by the audience. 

For references and material in preparing papers for Program Two 
see numbers 48, 72, 81, 98, 105 in list of authorities 



1 101 



Program Three 

YOUTH AND MANHOOD OF 
GEORGE WASHINGTON 



PATRIOTIC MUSIC (to be selected) 
PLEDGE TO THE FLAG 
THE AMERICAN'S CREED 

WASHINGTON THE BOY 

Strong, zestful, and ambitious, Washington was a leader of his 
mates. An expert surveyor, largely self -educated, he secured the 
patronage of Lord Fairfax. 

WASHINGTON'S TRAVEL, PURSUITS, AND IDEALS 

Surveyor, soldier, and legislator, Washington's frontier expert 
ence, wide travel, and social position gave him a complete view 
of Colonial life. 

WASHINGTON THE MAN HIMSELF 

At man's estate Washington was of heroic mold, poised, digni' 
fied, intuitively sensing his destiny, and acquitting himself 
accordingly. 

WASHINGTON'S FRIENDS AND ENEMIES 

Broadminded, Washington attached understanding minds. 
Eminence brought the antagonism of those jealous or incapable of 
sharing in his wide outlook. 

MUSIC 

Song, "America" or "Star-Spangled Banner," by the audience. 



For references and material in preparing papers for Program Three 
see numbers 15, 31, 32, 71, 105 in list of authorities 



ini 



Program Four 



THE MOTHER 
OF GEORGE WASHINGTON 



PATRIOTIC MUSIC (to be selected) 
PLEDGE TO THE FLAG 
THE AMERICAN'S CREED 

MARY BALL IN EARLY LIFE 

Mary Ball was of honorable ancestry. Early orphaned, her 
mother's will placed her and her property in the care of George 
Eskridge as guardian. She was known as the "Rose of Epping 
Forest" and the "Belle of the Northern Neck." 

MARY BALL WASHINGTON AS WIFE AND MOTHER 

The care-free, hospitable life of the Virginia planters prevailed 
at the homes of the Washingtons at Bridges Creek, at Little Hunt- 
ing Creek, and on the Rappahannock during the life of Augustine 
Washington, but this changed at his death. 

MARY BALL WASHINGTON IN LATER LIFE 

With a restricted income, the first years of widowhood were 
spent on the farm, devoted to the care and training of her five 
children. Later she lived in Fredericksburg, honored by her son 
and honored as his mother. 

MUSIC 

Song, "America" or "Star-Spangled Banner," by the audience. 



For references and material in preparing papers for Program Four 
see numbers 23, 32, 65, 72, 81 in list of authorities 



1121 



Program Five 



GEORGE WASHINGTON 
THE MAN OF SENTIMENT 



PATRIOTIC MUSJC (to be selected) 
PLEDGE TO THE FLAG 
THE AMERICAN'S CREED 

WASHINGTON THE SON 

George Washington, loving, dutiful, and thoughtful, gave his 
parents implicit obedience as a boy. As a young man he gave his 
mother's wishes respectful attention, and at the pinnacle of his 
fame paid tribute to the maternal hand that led him to manhood. 

WASHINGTON THE COUNTRY SQUIRE 

Washington was much like other young men of his day. A most 
eligible young bachelor of Virginia, with his estate and position. 
His attractions and attachments were part of his youth. His court- 
ship of Mrs. Custis is one of the cherished stories of his life. 

WASHINGTON THE HUSBAND 

To his wife Washington gave the chivalrous tender care and 
devotion of forty years of married life. He wrote her letters for 
her, made up her accounts, her orders, and kept her with him 
whenever possible, even at military headquarters. He loved her 
children and grandchildren as his own. 

MUSIC 

Song, "America" or "Star-Spangled Banner," by the audience. 



For references and material in preparing papers for Program Five 
see numbers 23, 71, 78, 81, 103 in list of authorities 



131 



Program Six 



GEORGE WASHINGTON 
THE MAN OF ACTION 



PATRIOTIC MUSIC (to be selected) 
PLEDGE TO THE FLAG 
THE AMERICAN'S CREED 

WASHINGTON A MAN OF ACTION 

Temperament, training, and circumstance always made George 
Washington a man of action. As a surveyor, soldier, commander 
in chief, farmer, and builder of canals, his life was diversified, and 
to each of his many vocations he gave the utmost of knowledge 
and effort for success. 

WASHINGTON THE BUSINESS MAN AND ENGINEER 

With a vision far beyond his day George Washington sought to 
promote all enterprises that developed transportation and com- 
munication between the seaboard and the frontiers. Every business 
project for the advancement of commerce and colonization had his 
support. 

WASHINGTON THE CITIZEN 

As a citizen George Washington had many interests and affilia' 
tions. He gave long and constructive service as a burgess, became 
a Freemason before he was of age and was pleased and proud of 
his chancellorship of William and Mary. Education with him was 
more than a hobby — it was a passion. 

MUSIC 

Song, "America" or "Star-Spangled Banner," by the audience. 



For references and material in preparing papers for Program Six 
see numbers 6, 7, 32, 34, 45, 53, 78 in list of authorities 



1 14 



Program Seven 



GEORGE WASHINGTON 
THE CHRISTIAN 



PATRIOTIC MUSIC (to be selected) 
PLEDGE TO THE FLAG 
THE AMERICAN'S CREED 

INHERITED RELIGIOUS ATTITUDE 

George Washington's Christian parents had him christened 
according to the rites of the Episcopal Church. The Bible and 
Sir Matthew Hale's Contemplation were part of his training, for 
he was reared to reverence God and give due respect to religious 
matters. 

IN MILITARY EXPERIENCES 

As a military officer, George Washington gave to religious serv- 
ices their place in his commands. Realising that through the stress 
and suffering of war men needed the support of their religious 
faith, he appealed for chaplains for the army. He attended church 
whenever war movements permitted. 

REVEALED RELIGIOUS CONVICTIONS 

No one can read the diaries or writings of George Washington 
without being impressed with his unfailing faith in Divine guid' 
ance and care. For his escapes he gave thanks to God, and for his 
victories and successes he gave the tribute of gratitude to Divine 
dispensation. 

MUSIC 

Song, "America" or "Star-Spangled Banner," by the audience. 



For references and material in preparing papers for Program Seven 
see numbers 23, 99, 103 in list of authorities 



1151 



Program Eight 



GEORGE WASHINGTON 
THE LEADER OF MEN 



PATRIOTIC MUSIC (to be selected) 
PLEDGE TO THE FLAG 
THE AMERICAN'S CREED 

WASHINGTON A LEADER IN EDUCATION 

George Washington, always regretful of his own lack of formal 
training, throughout his life advocated education and by his will 
sought to establish for our country such a university as he thought 
would develop good Americans. 

WASHINGTON A LEADER IN ADVANCEMENT 
OF CIVILIZATION 

In occupations, exact surveys, rotation of crops, diversified 
industry; in public affairs, a self-con trolling central government 
and the development of the West through it; in life, exact justice 
for himself and others, temperance, wide reading, rational pleas' 
ure — these were elements in Washington's stand for progress. 

WASHINGTON A LEADER IN PHILANTHROPY 

George Washington's many charities will probably never be 
known. His idea seemed always to help people to help themselves, 
but he fed them, clothed and housed them, paid their debts, and 
gave a real start to many with no claim of kinship. 

MUSIC 

Song, "America" or "Star^Spangled Banner," by the audience. 



For references and material in preparing papers for Program Eight 
see numbers 33, 40, 62, 92, 104 in list of authorities 



1161 



Program K[ine 



THE SOCIAL LIFE OF 
GEORGE WASHINGTON 



PATRIOTIC MUSIC (to be selected) 
PLEDGE TO THE FLAG 
THE AMERICAN'S CREED 

SOCIAL LIFE OF CHILDHOOD HOME 

Grounded in social amenities by his mother in the simplicity of 
her widow's farm home, George Washington gained additional 
social training in the hospitable social activities of the homes of 
his married brothers and their neighbors. 

SOCIAL LIFE BEFORE THE REVOLUTION 

With his marriage to Mrs. Custis, a belle at the viceregal court 
of Williamsburg, his official part of colonial society was formal and 
elegant. Such social life was likewise established in the Mount 
Vernon household and maintained until the Revolution. 

SOCIAL LIFE IN LATER YEARS 

Great natural dignity and habitual formality stamped social life 
at the Military Headquarters. The First President established a 
code of official etiquette which is the basis of that at the White 
House tO'day. 

MUSIC 

Song, "America" or "Star'Spangled Banner," by the audience. 



For references and material in preparing papers for Program JVftne 
see numbers 23, 72, 81, 85, 102 in list of authorities 



1171 



Program Ten 



GEORGE WASHINGTON THE BUILDER 
OF THE NATION 



PATRIOTIC MUSIC (to be selected) 
PLEDGE TO THE FLAG 
THE AMERICAN'S CREED 

MILITARY EXPERIENCES UNDER BRITISH RULE 

As messenger to warn away the French, as chief colonist in the 
expeditions against Fort Duquesne, and as guardian of the froiv 
tier, George Washington gave loyal service and acquired valuable 
experience. 

CHANGING VIEWS ON BRITISH CONTROL 

As the struggle between the English demands and the Colonial 
rights developed toward armed conflict, his views changed. He 
advocated nonimportation of British products. When Parliament 
sought to coerce Massachusetts he offered to raise and equip a 
thousand men and lead them to the relief of Boston. 

CREATION AND ORGANIZATION OF A NEW NATION 

As first in war he created nationality; as first in peace he advo- 
cated and helped frame an efficient and endurable Constitution; 
and because first in the hearts of his countrymen he was unani- 
mously elected President. 

MUSIC 

Song, "America" or "Star-Spangled Banner," by the audience. 



For references and material in preparing papers for Program Ten 
see numbers 18, 22, 33, 96, 98 in list of authorities 



1181 



Program Eleven 



GEORGE WASHINGTON THE PRESIDENT 
(1789-1797) 



PATRIOTIC MUSIC (to be selected) 
PLEDGE TO THE FLAG 
THE AMERICAN'S CREED 

TRIUMPHANT JOURNEY AS PRESIDENT ELECT 

Washington's popularity received its greatest expression during 
this journey. Everyone acclaimed the hero of war who was now 
called upon to be the leader in peace. 

FIRST TERM OF THE FIRST PRESIDENT (1789-1793) 

Great rejoicing, honor, and responsibility marked Washington's 
first administration. Precedents were made and the world shown 
that a wise man was in control. 

FIRST PRESIDENTIAL TOURS 

Washington set the precedent for presidential tours. Desiring 
to see the States under peace, he visited each section, traveling in 
his great state coach with proper display. 

SECOND TERM OF PRESIDENT WASHINGTON (1793-1797) 

Washington's second term, with Philadelphia as the capital, was 

productive of many policies of grave import. There social life in 

the Executive Mansion continued on formal lines. Among the 

precedents established was the refusal of a third term. 

MUSIC 

Song, "America" or "Star-Spangled Banner," by the audience. 



For references and material in preparing papers for Program Eleven 
see numbers 11, 12, 13, 33, 47, 98 in list of authorities 



119 



Program Twelve 



THE HOMEMAKING OF 
GEORGE AND MARTHA WASHINGTON 



PATRIOTIC MUSIC (to be selected) 
PLEDGE TO THE FLAG 
THE AMERICAN'S CREED 

COLONEL AND MRS. WASHINGTON IN RESIDENCE 
BEFORE THE REVOLUTION 

Colonel and Mrs. Washington established their home at Mount 
Vernon on a luxurious scale. The plantation, with its many slaves 
and servants, was like a small empire. The wealthiest couple of 
their community, they lived accordingly. 

WAR-TIME HOUSEHOLDS 

Patriotism banned imported luxuries from Mount Vernon with 
the approach of the Revolution. Mrs. Washington's regular winter 
visits brightened the meager life of military households during the 
war. 

PRESIDENTIAL HOUSEHOLDS 

To the Executive Mansions of New York and Philadelphia, 
President and Mrs. Washington devoted careful thought. Every 
detail was planned with regard for the dignity of the chief office 
of an independent nation. 

LAST YEARS AT MOUNT VERNON 

Mount Vernon drew people of every class and kind. General 
Washington held firsT: place in the hearts of the people. 

MUSIC 

Song, "America 11 or "Star-Spangled Banner, 11 by the audience. 

For references and material in preparing papers for Program Twelve 
see numbers 21, 23, 41, 63, 12, 105 in list of authorities 

1201 



ADDITIONAL ACTIVITIES 

[When making application for pageants and plays 3tate definitely the type of 

material desired, approximately the number of participants, and 

place of production, whether indoor or outdoor. 1 



PAGEANTS 
DEPICTING LIFE OF WASHINGTON 

Of all the lives of great Americans, George Washing- 
ton's diversified career affords an unusual opportunity for 
its portrayal in pageantry. This form of art may well be 
termed to-day "The Drama of Our Democracy. 1 ' Tribute 
to him who founded our country can be given in a colorful 
as well as a fitting manner by means of the varied arts uni- 
fied and expressed in the historical pageant. 

The coming Bicentennial Celebration in 1932 affords an 
opportunity for both child and adult, student and teacher, 
for clubs, colleges, and churches, for civic, fraternal, cul- 
tural, and patriotic bodies, for both the American and the 
foreign born in our midst, to give consideration to the use 
of the pageant in organising their Bicentennial programs. 

Because of the ever-growing tendency on the part of 
American communities and institutions to reach out and 
select this form of expression, not only for the reenactment 
of history but as a means for revelation of life itself, the 
George Washington Bicentennial Commission has engaged 
a specially qualified staff to select and to create pageants 
that will depict with dramatic accuracy significant scenes 
from the life of Washington. The foregoing programs them- 
selves suggest a variety of themes possible of treatment. 

I21J 



There will be provided pageants of different length, va- 
ried content, and adapted to the use of large and relatively 
small groups of participants. Instructions as to scenery, 
costumes, properties, organization, and production in gen- 
eral will accompany the pageants. 

In addition a list or bibliography of available George 
Washington pageants, with names of authors, publishers, 
and other informative matter, will be prepared for distri- 
bution. 

PLAYS AND PLAYLETS 
DEPICTING LIFE OF WASHINGTON 

Complete plays and one-act plays based on important 
episodes in the life of George Washington will be fur- 
nished upon request to responsible organizations, groups, 
dramatic societies, and schools. 

The materials furnished consist of text and dialogues, 
complete details of scenes and stage direction, and instruc- 
tion for making costumes and properties. These plays 
cover the whole range of George Washington's life from 
boyhood to manhood, the period of the founding of a 
nation, as President and statesman, agriculturist and 
engineer. 

They emphasise the more intimate side of his character 
so easily traced in his writings and carry an underlying 
theme which graphically portrays the true character of our 
First President, depicting the trials, doubts, disappoint- 
ments, cares, griefs, and pathos combined with the power 
and decision of his acts. 



I22J 



MOTION PICTURES 

OF LIFE AND TIMES OF WASHINGTON 

Depicting scenes and incidents covering the amazing 
life of George Washington through the medium of sound 
and color motion pictures is one of the projects now under 
way. This Commission, assisted by appropriate resources 
of the United States Government, is sponsoring these 
motion pictures, which are being prepared by the Eastman 
Kodak Company's Educational Service. 

It is of special interest to know that for the first time 
and perhaps for the only time scenes will be presented 
showing the interior and exterior of Mount Vernon, and 
other locations besides the home of the First President, 
which have never before been similarly photographed. 

An intimate association with the past will result from 
this authentic portrayal of life in the Colonial days. The 
original furniture associated with the Washington family 
at Mount Vernon, their household articles and those 
of other families of that period, will be available. The 
original costumes and uniforms worn by George Wash- 
ington, the one dress extant of Martha Washington, will 
again be seen in their once accustomed settings. 

And so before the eyes of the present generation will be 
spread an authentic vision of those hallowed days so dear 
to the heart of the nation. It will be a picture without par- 
allel in all history, and thus will be handed down to future 
generations the actual story in motion-picture form of the 
life of George Washington, his family, friends, neighbors, 
with all the intimate associations of his career as boy, youth, 



123 



citizen, soldier, statesman. No private or corporate in- 
terests with the wealth of an empire could secure from the 
Government repositories the necessary material and co- 
operation for such a production. 

This picture in many reels will be made available for 
schools, clubs, churches, and other meeting places of patri- 
otic organisations throughout the United States. 

SLIDES 

The Commission has under preparation colored slides 
showing the important events in the life of George Wash- 
ington. These slides will be arranged in sets suitable for 
use in connection with the twelve programs in this pam- 
phlet. Sets will also be arranged to illustrate a general ad- 
dress on the subject of George Washington. 

MUSIC 

The music of George Washington's time, and music since 
written which is particularly adaptable for use with pag- 
eants, plays, and patriotic programs generally, will be avail- 
able to those who desire to conduct such affairs. 

This collection of music will be interesting, entertaining, 
and valuable; and it is only one of the many contributions 
the Bicentennial will make available to those who would 
honor the name of George Washington. 

JUVENILE ACTIVITIES 

Twelve programs of a character-developing nature will 
be available for children. They depict the most important 
events in the life of George Washington. In addition there 
will be historical playlets, cantatas, dances, and games based 
upon the character-development stories. These stories and 

124} 



activities will be transcribed into Braille. Relief maps done 
in clay and color have been prepared on the following 
subjects: Washington's trip to the Northwest; Braddock's 
retreat; Boston massacre; campaign on Long Island; battle 
of Trenton; campaign in New Jersey; Cornwallis's surren- 
der. These maps are a new departure in both visual educa- 
tion and for those who can not see. 

SPEECHES 

Patriotic men and women, of thousands of organisations 
throughout the nation, can perform a signal service by pre- 
paring and delivering addresses upon various aspects of 
George Washington's life. Such addresses are interesting, 
instructive, and inspiring, and there is a patriotic need for 
such participation. Material, especially useful to speakers, 
debaters, etc., has been compiled by the Commission for 
such use and will be of value in any program. 

RADIO 

To those who can cooperate in arranging and delivering 
radio addresses of the character above mentioned the Bi- 
centennial Commission is prepared to give assistance. 

TREE PLANTING 

Tree planting is one of the popular ways of paying honor 
to George Washington in 1932. In addition to placing trees 
in civic centers, in parks, and along the highways, it is the 
hope of the Commission that a tree will be planted by the 
school children in every school yard in every State. 

The American Tree Association, Washington, D. C, is 
cooperating with the United States George Washington 
Bicentennial Commission in directing this work. "Ten mil- 

125! 



lion monuments to a great man' 1 is the aim of the American 
Tree Association. "Ten million tributes, enduring and 
straight-growing, which will be as evergreen as is the mem- 
ory of George Washington." 

"Plant trees for George Washington." That is the cry 
that is going up in all parts of the country. Plant now, or 
at any suitable time before the winter of 1932, so that strong, 
healthy trees will be firmly rooted when they are dedicated 
in 1932 in the name of the Father of Our Country. 

We hope that every citizen in every city, town, and vil- 
lage — and, even more important, every future citizen — 
will hear of the plans for paying honor to George Washing- 
ton and will have a part in the tree-planting program. 

The "Bicentennial Tree Planting Book" gives sugges- 
tions for a program and tells how to plant trees and shrubs. 
It also contains a program for a Tree Planting Ceremony. 
Write to the George Washington Bicentennial Commission 
or the American Tree Association, Washington, D. C. The 
book will be sent without charge. 



WASHINGTON LETTERS 

Many a gem of historical value, such as unpublished or 
obscure letters, documents, or other writings by George 
Washington, are still to be found hidden away in family 
archives or reposing in private collections. These together 
with letters received by him regarding personages and 
events of his time are of vast importance to this Commis- 
sion, and it is anxious to learn of these treasures, not for 
the purpose of acquiring them but that they may be listed 
and copies secured for the use of historians. 

12611 



SELECTED BOOKS RELATING TO 
GEORGE WASHINGTON 

Out of the hundreds of volumes relating to George 
Washington and his service to his country the following 
will be especially accurate, interesting, and generally 
available : 

1. ADAMS, John. Wor\s. Vols. II, III, IX. (Boston, Little Brown, 

1850-1854.) 

2. ANDREWS, Charles M. Colonial Folkways (Chronicles of 

America, Vol. IX). (New Haven, Yale University Press, 
1921.) 

3. ANDREWS, Charles M. Colonial Period. (New York, Holt, 

1912.) 

4. AVERY, Elroy M. History of the United States and its People. 

Vols. V-VII. (Cleveland, Burrows, 1908-1910.) 

5. BAKER, William S., ed. Early Sketches of George Washington. 

(Philadelphia, Lippincott, 1893.) 

6. BAKER, William S. Itinerary of General Washington from 

June 15, 1775, to December 23, 1783. (Philadelphia, Lip- 
pincott, 1892.) 
7- BAKER, William S. Washington After the Revolution. (Phila- 
delphia, Lippincott, 1898.) 

8. BEER, George L. British Colonial Policy, 1754-1765. (New 

York, Macmillan, 1907.) 

9. BELCHER, Henry. First American Civil War. 2 vols. (New 

York, Macmillan, 1911.) 

10. BEMIS, Samuel F. Jays Treaty. (New York, Macmillan, 1923.) 

11. BEVERIDGE, Albert J. Life of John Marshall. Vol. II. (Boston, 

Houghton Mifflin, 1916.) 

12. BOWEN, Clarence W. "Inauguration of Washington." (Cen* 

tury Magazine, Vol. 37, 1889.) 

13. BOWERS, Claude G. Jefferson and Hamilton. (Boston, Hough- 

ton Mifflin, 1925.) 

14. BRACKENRIDGE, Henry M. History of the Western Insurrec- 

tion in Western Pennsylvania. (Pittsburgh, W. S. Haven, 
1859.) 

1271 



15. BROOKS, Elbridge S. True Story of George Washington. (Bos- 

ton, Lothrop, 1895.) 

16. BRYAN, Wilhelmus B. History of the Rational Capital. 

Vol. I. (New York, Macmillan, 1914.) 

17. CALLAHAN, Charles H. Washington the Man and the Mason. 

(Washington, 1913.) 

18. CHANNING, Edward. History of the United States. Vols. Ill, 

IV. (New York, Macmillan, 1912-1917.) 

19. CONWAY, Moncure D. Barons of the Potomac\ and the Rap- 

pahannock (New York, Grolier Club, 1892.) 

20. CONWAY, Moncure D. "English Ancestry of Washington." 

(Harper s Magazine, Vol. 84, 1891.) 

21. CONWAY, Moncure D., ed. George Washington and Mount 

Vernon. (Brooklyn, Long Island Historical Society, 1889.) 

22. CORBIN, John. Unknown Washington. (New York, Scribner, 

1930.) 

23. CUSTIS, George W. P. Recollections and Private Memoirs of 

Washington. (Philadelphia, William Flint, 1859; other eds.) 

24. EARLE, Alice M. Child Life in Colonial Days. (New York, 

Macmillan, 1899.) 

25. EARLE, Alice M. Home Life in Colonial Days. (New York, 

Macmillan, 1898.) 

26. EARLE, Alice M. Old Time Gardens. (New York, Macmillan, 

1901.) 

27. EARLE, Alice M. Stage-Coach and Tavern Days. (New York, 

Macmillan, 1900.) 

28. EARLE, Alice M. Two Centuries of Costume in America. 2 

vols. (New York, Macmillan, 1903.) 

29. EARLE, Swepson. Chesapeake Bay Country. (Baltimore, Thorn- 

sen-Ellis, 1923.) 

30. FISHER, Sydney G. Struggle for American Independence. 2 vols. 

(Philadelphia, Lippincott, 1908.) 

31. FITZPATRICK, John C. George Washington, Colonial Trav- 

eller, 1732-1775. (Indianapolis, Bobbs-Merrill, 1927.) 

32. FORD, Paul L. True George Washington. (Philadelphia, Lippin- 

cott, 1896.) 

33. FORD, Worthington C. George Washington. 2 vols. (New 

York, Scribner, 1900.) 



281 



34. FROTHINGHAM, Thomas G. Washington, Commander in 

Chief. (Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1930.) 

35. GERWIG, George W. Washington, the Young Leader. (New 

York, Scribner, 1923.) 

36. GIBBS, George. Memoirs of the Administrations of Washington 

and John Adams. Vol. I. (New York, Van Norden, 1846.) 
37- GIST, Christopher. Journals. (Pittsburgh, Weldin, 1893.) 

38. HAMILTON, John C. History of the Republic of the United 

States of America as traced in the Writings of Alexander 
Hamilton and of his Contemporaries. 7 vols. (New York, 
Appleton, 1857-1864.) 

39. HAMILTON, Stanislaus M.,ed. Letters to Washington. 5 vols. 

(Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1898-1902.) 

40. HAPGOOD, Norman. George Washington. (New York, Mac 

millan, 1901.) 

41. HARLAND, Marion. Some Colonial Homesteads and their 

Stories. (New York, Putnam, 1897-) 

42. HART, Albert B. Formation of the Union, 17 50-1829. Rev. ed. 

(New York, Longmans Green, 1925.) 

43. HART, Albert B. George Washington: Reading with a Purpose. 

(Chicago, American Library Association, 1930.) 

44. HATCH, Louis C. Administration of the American Revolution- 

ary Army. (New York, Longmans Green, 1904.) 

45. HAWORTH, Paul L. George Washington, Country Gentleman. 

(Indianapolis, Bobbs'Merrill, 1925.) 

46. HEATH, William. Memoirs. (Boston, Thomas & Andrews, 

1798; later eds.) 
47- HENDERSON, Archibald. Washington s Southern Tour, 1791. 
(Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1923.) 

48. HERBERT, Leila. First American, His Homes and His House- 

holds. (New York, Harper, 1900.) 

49. HILL, Frederick T. On the Trail of Washington. (New York, 

Appleton, 1910.) 

50. HOWARD, George E. Preliminaries of the Revolution. (Amer- 

ican Ration, Vol. VIII.) (New York, Harper, 1905.) 

51. HULBERT, Archer B. Colonel Washington. (Marietta, Ohio, 

Western Reserve University, 1903.) 

52. HULBERT, Archer B. Historic Highways of America. Vols. 

II-V. (Cleveland, Clark, 1902-3.) 

1291 



53. HULBERT, Archer B. Washington and the West. (New York, 

Century, 1905.) 

54. IRVING, Washington. Life of George Washington. 5 vols. 

(New York, Putnam, 1855-1859; later eds.) 

55. JERNEGEN, Marcus B. American Colonies, 1492-1750. (New 

York, Longmans Green, 1929.) 

56. JOHNSON, Bradley T. General Washington. (New York, 

Appleton, 1894.) 

57. KITE, Elizabeth S. V Enfant and Washington, 1791-1792. (Bal- 

timore, Johns Hopkins Press, 1929.) 

58. LEAR, Tobias. Letters and Recollections of George Washington. 

(New York, Doubleday Page, 1906.) 

59. LECKY, William E. H. American Revolution. (New York, Ap- 

pleton, 1898.) 

60. LEE, Charles. Lee Papers. 4 vols. (New York Historical Society, 

Collections, 1871-1874.) 

61. LITTLE, Shelby. George Washington. (New York, Minton 

Balch, 1929.) 

62. LODGE, Henry C. George Washington. 2 vols. (American 

Statesmen.) Rev. ed. (Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1898.) 

63. LOSSING, Benson J. Home of Washington. (New York, Virtue 

6? Yorston, 1871; earlier eds.) 

64. LOSSING, Benson J. Life of Washington. 3 vols. (New York, 

Virtue, 1860; later eds.) 

65. LOSSING, Benson J. Mary and Martha, the Mother and Wife of 

George Washington. (New York, Harper, 1886.) 

66. MACE, William H. Washington, a Virginia Cavalier. (Chi- 

cago, Rand McNally, 1916.) 

67. MACKAYE, Percy. Washington the Man Who Made Us. (New 

York, Knopf, 1919.) 

68. McMASTER, John B. History of the People of the United States. 

Vols. I, II. (New York, Appleton, 1883-1885.) 

69. MARSHALL, John. Life of George Washington. 5 vols. (Fred- 

ericksburg, Va., 1926; first pub. 1804-1807.) 

70. MEADE, William. Old Churches, Ministers and Families of 

Virginia. 2 vols. (Philadelphia, Lippincott, 1857-) 

71. MITCHELL, S. Weir. Youth of Washington. (New York, Cen- 

tury, 1904.) 



1301 



72. MOORE, Charles. Family Life of George Washington. (Boston, 

Houghton Mifflin, 1926.) 

73. NELSON, William. "American Newspapers of the Eighteenth 

Century as Sources of History/ ' (American Historical Asso' 
ciation, Report for 1908, Vol. I.) 

74. OGG, Frederic A. Opening of the Mississippi. (New York, Mac- 

millan, 1904.) 

75. OSBORN, Lucretia P., ed. Washington Spea\s for Himself. 

(New York, Scribner, 1927.) 

76. PITT, William. Correspondence with Colonial Governors. Edited 

by Gertrude S. Kimball. 2 vols. (New York, Macmillan, 
1906.) 
77- PRUSSING, Eugene E. Estate of George Washington, Deceased. 
(Boston, Little Brown, 1927.) 

78. PRUSSING, Eugene E. George Washington in Love and Other- 

wise. (Chicago, Covici, 1925.) 

79. ROOSEVELT, Theodore. Winning of the WeSt. 4 vols. (New 

York, Putnam, 1889-1896.) 

80. ROWLAND, Kate M. Life of George Mason. (New York, Put- 

nam, 1892. 

81. SAWYER, Joseph D. Washington. 2 vols. (New York, Macmil- 

lan, 1927.) 

82. SCHAUFFLER, Robert H., ed. Washington's Birthday. (New 

York, Moffat Yard, 1910.) 

83. SCHLESINGER, Arthur M. Colonial Merchants and the Amer- 

ican Revolution. (New York, Columbia University, 1917-) 

84. SEEL YE, Elizabeth. Story of Washington. (New York, Appleton, 

1893.) 

85. SMITH, Helen E. Colonial Days & Ways. (New York, Cen- 

tury, 1900.) 

86. SMITH, William H. St. Clair Papers. 2 vols. (Cincinnati, 

Clarke, 1882.) 

87. SPARKS, Jared. Life of George Washington. (Boston, Tappan 6? 

Dennet, 1842.) 

88. STANARD, Mary N. Colonial Virginia. (Philadelphia, Lip- 

pincott, 1917.) 

89. STRYKER, William S. Battles of Trenton and Princeton. (Bos- 

ton, Houghton Mifflin, 1898.) 

90. STRYKER, William S. Battle of Monmouth. (Princeton, Prince- 

ton University Press, 1927.) 

1311 



91. THACHER, James. Military Journal During the American 

olutionary War. 2d ed., rev. (Boston, Cotton 6? Barn 
1827.) 

92. THAYER, William R. George Washington. (Boston, Hou^h 

Mifflin, 1922.) 

93. TOWER, Charlemagne. Marquis de La Fayette in the Amen 

Revolution. 2 vols. (Philadelphia, Lippincott, 1895.) 

94. TREVELYAN, Sir George Otto. American Revolution. 

ed. 4 vols. (New York, Longmans Green, 1905-1912 

95. TREVELYAN, Sir George Otto. George the Third and Ch 

Fox. 2 vols. (New York, Longmans Green, 1912-1914 

96. VAN TYNE, Claude H. Founding of the American Repu 

Vols. I, II. (Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1922-1929.) 

97. VOLWILLER, Albert T. George Croghan and the Weft 

Movement. (Cleveland, Clark, 1926.) 

98. WASHINGTON, George. Diaries. Edited by John C. Fit? 

rick. 4 vols. (Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1925.) 

99. WASHINGTON, George. Rules of Civility. Edited by Cha 

Moore. (Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1926.) 

100. WASHINGTON, George. Writings. Edited by Worthingto 

Ford. 14 vols. (New York, Putnam, 1889-1893.) 

101. WATERS, Henry F. Examination of the English AnceStr 

George Washington. (Boston, New England Historic G 
alogical Society, 1889.) 

102. WHARTON, Anne H. Social Life in the Early Republic. (P 

delphia, Lippincott, 1902.) 

103. WHIPPLE, Wayne, ed. Story-Life of Washington. (Philadelp 

Winston, 1911.) 

104. WILSON, Woodrow. George Washington. (New York, Har 

1896.) 

105. WILSTACH, Paul. Mount Vernon. (Garden City, N. 

Doubleday Page, 1916.) 

106. WINSOR, Justin. Narrative and Critical History of Ame 

Vols. VI, VII. (Boston, Houghton Mifflin, 1887-1888 

107. WISTER, Owen. Seven Ages of Washington. (New York, > 

millan, 1907.) 



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